The Golden Twenties: Portraits and Figure Paintings by Joseph Kleitsch

March 5, 2017-August 6, 2017

The career of Joseph Kleitsch (1882–1931) is often categorized into two parts: his early work as a portraitist in his native Hungary and in Chicago and his impressionist landscapes painted in California during his later years. However, Kleitsch continued to paint figurative works after his move to California in 1920 and was considered the premiere portrait painter in the artist’s haven of Laguna Beach until his untimely death in 1931. The Golden Twenties is the first museum exhibition to assemble Kleitsch’s remarkable portraits and figure paintings. With a jewel-toned palette influenced by his native Hungary and a lighter, golden palette developed after his arrival in California, the works demonstrate the artist’s exceptional ability to reveal the unique personality, demeanor, and essence of each subject.

The Golden Twenties: Portraits and Figure Paintings by Joseph Kleitsch is organized by the Pasadena Museum of California Art and curated by California scholar, writer, and curator Patricia Trenton, PhD. A 137-page hardcover catalogue accompanies the exhibition. Published by the PMCA, the catalogue features 64 full-color images and an essay and catalogue entries by Dr. Trenton.

The exhibition and catalogue are supported by the PMCA Board of Directors; the PMCA Ambassador Circle; Lead Patrons Earlene and Herbert Seymour; Presenting Patrons Christine and Reed Halladay; Underwriting Patrons Simon K. Chiu, Lori and Jeff Hyland, Bob and Arlene Oltman, and Anonymous; Benefactor Patrons Yvonne Boseker and Gail and Peter Ochs; Sustaining Patrons Bram and Sandra Dijkstra, Michael Feddersen, Penny and Jay Lusche, Gayle and Ed Roski, Irene and George Stern, and Anonymous; and Contributing Patrons Susan and Robert Ehrlich, Jerrold and Judith Felsenthal, Thomas and Jane Glover, Eric Jessen, Joyce and Tom Leddy, Tobey Moss and Allen Moss, Mel and Betty Sembler, Carol and Cliff Trenton, and Ruth Westphal. Additional support is provided by Bonhams Fine Art Auctions, The Redfern Gallery, and a generous grant from the Historical Collections Council of California Art.

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Interstitial

March 5, 2017-August 6, 2017

What happens to ordinary entities of domestic life when they are driven into territories where their standard uses or functions are suspended and upended and new meanings are forged? Interstitial seeks to answer this question through the examination of new and recently-created free-standing sculptures by contemporary Los Angeles-based object makers whose work exists in the interstices, the spaces between the historical genres of the decorative arts, still life, and abstraction. In the exhibition, artists Jeff Colson, Renee Lotenero, Kristen Morgin, Joel Otterson, Rebecca Ripple, Aili Schmeltz, and Shirley Tse take quotidian and overlooked objects outside of their usual settings and modify, disassemble, and/or reassemble them, catapulting the objects into other dimensions, ones that are, at times, strange, comical, and unnerving. These works reside in the interstitial space: in between the memory of their previous function or usage and their abrupt and unexpected presence in the museum.

Interstitial is organized by the Pasadena Museum of California Art, curated by John David O’Brien, and accompanied by a brochure. The exhibition is supported by the PMCA Board of Directors and PMCA Ambassadors Circle and is made possible in part by the Pasadena Arts & Culture Commission and the City of Pasadena Cultural Affairs Division. Additional funding is provided by Mary Jane Alexander.

City_Pasadena

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Gustave Baumann in California

March 5, 2017-August 6, 2017

Gustave Baumann (1881–1971) was a pioneer in the development of the color woodcut in the United States. Although he is best known for his bucolic scenes of the Midwest and his majestic imagery of the American Southwest, he made twelve powerful color woodcuts depicting the natural beauty of the Golden State. Inspired by seven automobile trips to California between 1927 and 1940 and his long drives up the scenic coast from San Diego to San Francisco, the works portray California’s coastline; its redwood, sequoia, and Torrey pine forests; and its Spanish-influenced architecture. The exhibition brings the California works together with a selection of Baumann’s formative color woodcuts of rural Brown County, Indiana—five from his Hills o’ Brown series and three of his largest color woodcuts. Baumann exhibited these Indiana woodcuts at the 1915 Panama Pacific International Exposition (PPIE) in San Francisco where he won a gold medal for printmaking. Gustave Baumann in California includes works by the two California printmakers most directly affected by the PPIE print exhibition, Frances Gearhart and William S. Rice. To illustrate Baumann’s printmaking process, the exhibition incorporates didactic materials, including a tempera study, a set of wood blocks, and a series of progressive proofs for his color woodcut, Singing Woods. There are also tempera studies of San Francisco before the bridges and of the then-quaint village of Laguna Beach.

Gustave Baumann in California is organized by the Pasadena Museum of California Art, curated by Susan Futterman, and accompanied by a brochure. The exhibition is supported by the PMCA Board of Directors, the PMCA Ambassador Circle, and lead supporter the Ann Baumann Trust. Additional funding is provided by Corinna Cotsen and Lee Rosenbaum, Erica and Vin Di Bona, Laurence K. Gould Jr., Joanne and Bruce Kerner,  Harvey and Ellen Knell, Hannah and Russel Kully, Joan and Jeffrey Palmer, Jonas B. Siegel, Lauren Siegel and Arnold Siegel, Reba and Geoffrey Thomas, Betsey Tyler, Reba White Williams, The Annex Galleries, John Moran Auctioneers, and Westmount Asset Management. Support for children’s educational programming is provided by a generous grant from the John and Beverly Stauffer Foundation.

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